Anita Clarke is the founder and Editor in Chief of the popular Toronto fashion blog, I want – I got. She’s been called a Toronto Fashion Hero by Now Magazine, Woman of the Year by She Takes on the World and one of the Worthy 30 by Shinan Govani. She has spoken on the topics of fashion, marketing, PR and social media. In July 2009, she was featured in a window showcase for Holt Renfrew that was shown in stores across Canada.
Blog: I want I got 
Twitter: @geekigirl
How can someone grab your attention with a pitch?
First off, pitches that get my attention are, most importantly, relevant to my blog. They are well-crafted and not verbose. All the information I need is usually included in the pitch. 
I love PR companies that use flickr or other storage methods to provide me with all relevant images and press releases, without having to write a reply email. I also love pitches that provide me just the facts and no opinion. I’ve received many pitches where the writer proclaims that I’ll just love the product. That usually makes me more skeptical, as I like to come to these decisions myself.
  Anita in front of her Holt Renfrew Fashion Blogger window.
What do you find most useful when dealing with public relations professionals?
I like that they can provide more information that would be hard to research otherwise. They really can add value to a post with images, samples and additional information. They provide access to designers, events, etc. and that offers lots of value for a post.
What is the biggest mistake PR professionals make?
Not respecting my time. I think many people assume that I blog for a living when in reality, I have a full time job. I believe this is the case for the majority of bloggers. 
Sending pitches that are irrelevant to my site. 
Lack of respect for online media. If online media exposure isn’t important, then don’t engage them. Treating them as second class citizens doesn’t help your company or the brand you are representing.
The “mailing list method” of PR. You get more results with well researched and crafted pitches, rather than the email blast to everyone and their mother.
Your pet peeve?
I hate it when a PR company emails and says “I love/read your blog”, which is then followed up with a totally irrelevant pitch. It really leaves a bad impression for me, because they are obviously lying. Let the product do the talking instead of sucking up to my ego.
I have a fashion blog, but please don’t send me pitches that have to do with celebrity fashion.
I hate press releases in image format. Copy and paste are important to me.